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Chemistry

Enthalpy (continued)

It is the enthalpy of a neutralization reaction (between an acid and a base forming salt and water). The reaction is exothermic. It is the variation of enthalpy verified in the neutralization of 1mol H + of acid by 1mol OH- of the base, being all substances in total or infinite dilution, at 25 ° C and 1atm. Examples: It is the variation of enthalpy involved in dissolving 1mol of a given substance in an amount of water sufficient for the obtained solution to be diluted.
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Chemistry

Curiosities (page 3)

What are organic products? Why is our world colorful? Where does the odor from our perspiration come from? How did the IUPAC nomenclature come about? Salt Empire How important is iron in our body? Why do salads wither? Chemical Elements and Their Symbols in the Middle Ages Chemical Elements and the Stars
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Physics

Movement Amount (continued)

Conservation of Movement Amount Like mechanical energy, the amount of movement is also maintained when there are no dissipative forces, ie the system is conservative, closed or mechanically isolated. A system is conservative if: So if the system is conservative we have: Since the mass of a body, or even of a system, hardly varies, what changes is their speed.
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Chemistry

Lipids

Lipids are of great importance to the functioning of the body of humans. They constitute animal and vegetable oils and fats. They can be found in foods such as butters and margarines, olive oil, oils, hams, salami and in high fat fruits such as avocado.
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Physics

Magnetic force on a conductive wire

Whenever a charge is put under the influence of a magnetic field, it undergoes an interaction that can alter its motion. If the magnetic field in question is uniform, we have seen that there will be a force acting on the load with intensity, where is the angle formed in the plane between the velocity vectors and the magnetic field.
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Chemistry

Glycides (continued)

Fructose The name "fructose" was coined in 1857 by William Miller, an English chemist. Also known as fruit sugar, it is a monosaccharide (C 6 H 12 O 6). Note that the molecular formula of fructose is the same as glucose, but they are differentiated by the characteristic group, which in the fructose molecule is a ketone group, while in the glucose molecule is an aldehyde.
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